CHION-IN ENGLISH SITE

Chion-in’s Gardens

Hōjō Garden (Designated by Kyoto City as a Famous Scenic Spot)

Seishidō (Mahāsthāmaprāpta Hall)
Cherry Blossoms in the Hōjō Garden

Autumn Foliage Lit Up
Autumn Foliage Lit Up

The Hōjō Garden is in the chisen kaiyūshiki (garden which is designed around a pond) style and is said to have been designed in the early Edo (1600-1868) period by the monk Gyokuen, who was connected to garden master Kobori Enshū. The garden includes the Shinji-ike (Heart Character) Pond, the Aoi-an Teahouse, and the Tokugawa Gongendō Hall. The cherry blossoms in the spring, the fresh greenery in early summer, the reflection of the autumn foliage onto the Shinji-ike Pond, and the snowy scenery and clear air in the winter can all clearly be seen, and along with imposing view of the Higashiyama mountains in the background, the garden exudes the moods of the four seasons.

Yūzen’en Garden

Yūzen’en Garden

The Yūzen’en Garden was redesigned in 1954 in commemoration of the 300th birthday of Miyazaki Yūzen, the founder of the Yūzen style of dyeing. This is a famous modern garden which consists of two gardens: one that draws water from a Higashiyama spring and one in the karesansui (dry rock garden) style. Inside the garden, there are two teahouses: the first is Karoku-an, which is modeled after an Urasenke-style teahouse, and the Hakuju-an, which was built in commemoration of the 99th birthday of Nakamura Kōryū, the 86th chief high priest of the Chion-in. These teahouses add a touch of taste fitting of a famous garden that represents the heart of Japan.

Yūzen’en Garden
page top